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A Rhode Island man was arrested for allegedly selling ‘ghost guns’ and selling guns to the Dominican Republic

Most firearms that cannot be traced are “privately manufactured firearms” (PMF’s), known as “ghost guns”.

Robert Alcantara, 34, was charged with one count of conspiracy to traffic a weapon and one count of making false statements, the US Justice Department said. in a press release. Each charge carries a maximum sentence of five years in prison.

Alcantara allegedly purchased most of the ghost guns he owned in unfinished form and perfected them at a work station at his Providence home, according to criminal charges filed by the United States Attorney’s Office. Ky.

Alcantara then allegedly shipped the guns to the Dominican Republic via Miami, where he sold them for several thousand dollars, the lawsuit says.

Between September 2019 and November 2021, Alcantara allegedly worked with various accomplices to manufacture, test, sell and deliver the weapon, according to the lawsuit.

On November 20, New York law enforcement officers recovered parts for 45 ghost guns from Alcantara’s vehicle while he was driving in the Bronx, according to the lawsuit.

Prosecutors said they recovered a photo from Robert Alcantara's phone showing machinery, including sanding belts, hydaulic drills and dremel tools, all of the tools used to make the gun ghost.

When arrested by law enforcement, Alcantara lied to investigators, stating that “he had never sold or transferred ownership of a firearm to any other individual and he had never now shipped a firearm to the Dominican Republic,” the lawsuit alleges.

“The untraceable ‘ghost gun’ poses a serious threat to public safety,” US Attorney Damian Williams said in a press release. “As alleged, defendant agreed with others to purchase parts for these guns, assemble them in his home, then illegally sell or attempt to sell more than 100 of the firearms.” there.”

An attorney for Alcantara, John Calcagni, said he does not comment on pending cases. Alcantara’s case is currently being handled by the United States Attorney’s Office for the Southern District Drug Unit of New York and Assistant United States Attorney Kevin Mead is leading the prosecution.

“As is believed to have happened here, the PMF trade endangers our communities,” said US Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security, Export Enforcement Office Special Agent in charge Jonathan Carson said. “The Office of Export Enforcement will continue to work with other law enforcement agencies to combat the smuggling of illegal weapons, including ‘ghost guns’ that are difficult to trace.”

Efforts to tighten restrictions on ghost guns

Ghost gun is self-assembled gun, often bundled with parts sold online, do not have serial numbers. Buying kits or individual parts requires no background checks, which means basically anyone can buy them.
DOJ establishes gun trafficking strike force in five cities to crack down on sources of gun-related crime

Some ghost guns can be built in under 30 minutes using kits and parts purchased online.

In May, the Justice Department proposed a rule that seeks to reclassify the definition of firearms to close a regulatory loophole related to the production of ghost guns.

Once implemented, the proposed rule will help regulate the sale of “ghost guns” in a variety of ways, including, keeping firearms from being sold to convicts and other prohibited purchasers with background checks; sets requirements for federally licensed firearms dealers to add serial numbers to 3D printed firearms or other unserialized firearms they stock and requires Manufacturers include serial numbers on the weapon “frame or receiver” for ease of making firearm kits.

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