Health

Can probiotics clear my bad wind? DR MARTIN SCURR answers your health questions


I recently had an endoscopy. Despite the sedation, it was the most painful procedure I have ever endured. Worse, it left me with a terrible wind. On the other hand, I am a healthy and fit 80-year-old man. My GP suggested probiotics.

Names and addresses are retained.

I am sorry that you have endured great discomfort during and after your colonoscopy. The good news is that there are no signs of illness, such as cancer.

But for your present problem, I agree with your doctor: the highly irritating gas you describe in your longer letter is due to disturbance to the microbiome, a variety of tiny creatures that live in our intestines.

Somehow, the balance of these organisms has been altered so that organisms that produce harmful gases, such as hydrogen sulphide and methane, are more common.

Taking probiotics, as your doctor has suggested, is an affordable way to deal with this. Look for products with high numbers of bacteria per dose (at least ten million). Also, try to eat fermented foods daily, as this will add more ‘good’ bacteria to your microbiome. I recommend raw yogurt and kefir yogurt (fermented milk is now widely available in supermarkets).

As for your current problem, I agree with your doctor: the very irritating gas you describe in your longer letter is caused by a disturbance in the microbiome, a bunch of tiny organisms live in our intestines.

As for your current problem, I agree with your doctor: the very irritating gas you describe in your longer letter is caused by a disturbance in the microbiome, a bunch of tiny organisms live in our intestines.

As for your current problem, I agree with your doctor: the very irritating gas you describe in your longer letter is caused by a disturbance in the microbiome, a bunch of tiny organisms live in our intestines.

Sauerkraut is another option, although it needs to be fresh from the fridge and not from the jar, as the pasteurization process can kill as many bugs as you want.

And think about adding prebiotic foods to your diet. They contain fiber that ‘feeds’ the friendly bacteria you want to encourage.

Good sources of prebiotics include Jerusalem artichokes, leeks, garlic, onions, asparagus, bananas, oats, and apples. As always, though, more doesn’t necessarily mean better: introduce these foods slowly so you don’t aggravate an existing hangover.

Changing your microbiome can take months, but there’s every reason to be optimistic.

Three months ago, I developed a gimmick that required me to be hospitalized. Then I was told a CT scan showed a calcified meningioma [brain tumour], it was a shock. My doctor told me it was 8mm, and located in the right frontal region of my brain.

Jean Morgan, Bournemouth, Dorset.

Meningiomas are the most common type of brain tumor and are usually only discovered when the brain is scanned for other reasons. I suspect in your case this has ruled out the stroke.

First I can assure you that the word ‘tumor’ means tumor, not cancer. Meningiomas are slow-growing, benign tumors in the meninges, the membrane that covers the brain. One study found that they occur in about 1% of the population, mainly in people 65 and older.

Meningiomas usually cause no symptoms – dizziness only occurs with meningioma in the lower back part of the brain. For people in the frontal lobes, like yours (and especially small like yours), I wouldn’t expect any symptoms.

‘Calcified’ means that your meningioma has hardened and is unlikely to grow much, if at all.

I suggest that it is for these reasons that your hospital physician take no further action, although in my opinion the professional approach would be to call you in and explain the findings. . I recommend rescanning again after a year, with subsequent scans depending on size increase.

In a study of 400 patients, only 11% of meningiomas grew larger.

Treatment is needed only when the meningioma becomes too large to cause neurological impairment and then radiation or surgery is recommended.

In my nearly 40 years as a general practitioner, I have never seen a case of a meningioma turning malignant.

In short, the best way is to wait carefully, with a follow-up scan in due time.

Write a letter to Dr. Scurr

Send your questions to Good Health, Daily Mail, 2 Derry Street, London W8 5TT or email: [email protected] The answers should be taken in the general context. Consult your own doctor when there are any health concerns.

In my view: The patient is slowly disappearing

One of the best things about being a general practitioner is the sense of doing something worthwhile – especially in our role as a medical friend and advocate for those who are sick. , fighting for patients in difficulty.

An important part of this is being available to patients when they need you. But that has changed a lot, rapidly by the pandemic. This was reflected in the news last week that approval ratings for GP services had dropped to their lowest levels ever.

However, it is too simplistic to blame the pandemic alone: ​​it is the last straw for a public increasingly dissatisfied with the general practice – something that has long been predicted by those of us who are who remembers the days before switching to a more limited service.

This has forced us to change with a series of changes, including discontinuing 24-hour care and abandoning patients with established GPs. As a result, patients are no longer accessed as they once enjoyed and continuity of care is lost.

Source: | This article originally belonged to Dailymail.co.uk



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