Health

Experts say ALL US adults under 65 should be screened for anxiety


All American adults under the age of 65 should be regularly screened for anxiety, a group of top US doctors said Tuesday.

The US Preventive Services Task Force has published a draft guideline recommending that doctors screen patients even if they have no symptoms. While the document will be public until October 17, it looks like the team will confirm the guidance.

The team has been working on guidance on anxiety screening since before the COVID-19 outbreak in early 2020, but the pandemic – and the rise in mental health problems across the US as a result of it they have become more and more relevant up to this point.

Anxiety disorders are one of the most common mental health complaints, affecting about 40 percent of American women at any one time, said Lori Pbert, a task force member and co-author. that in life and more than a quarter of men.

The Anxiety & Depression Association of America estimates that nearly 20% of Americans have an active anxiety disorder with women and those under 45 at greatest risk. About a third of teenagers are also thought to be suffering from this condition.

The task force says the evidence of benefits, including effective treatments, outweighs any risks, including inaccurate screening results that could lead to inadequate follow-up care. necessary, needs.

A group of leading doctors recommends that all adults ages 18 to 65 be screened regularly for anxiety by their primary care physician.

A group of leading doctors recommends that all adults ages 18 to 65 be screened regularly for anxiety by their primary care physician.

A group of leading doctors recommends that all adults ages 18 to 65 be screened regularly for anxiety by their primary care physician.

Common screening tools include brief questionnaires about symptoms such as fear and anxiety that interfere with usual activities.

The task force said these could easily be provided in a primary care setting, although it did not specify how often patients should be tested.

“The most important thing to realize is that screening alone is not enough to diagnose anxiety,” says Pbert.

The next step is a more thorough evaluation by a mental health professional, although Pbert acknowledges that finding mental health care can be difficult due to the lack of specialists.

Blacks, those living in poverty, those who have lost a spouse, and those with other mental health problems are adults who face a higher risk of developing anxiety, may manifest as panic attacks, phobias, or feelings of constant anxiety. In addition, about 1 in 10 pregnant and postpartum women experience anxiety.

In April, the group released similar draft guidelines for children and adolescents, recommending screening for anxiety but stating that more research is needed on the potential benefits and harms of self-screening. child death with no obvious signs.

Guidelines from the task force often determine coverage, but anxiety has been on the radar of many primary care physicians.

In 2020, a group affiliated with the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommended routine primary care anxiety screening for women and girls beginning at age 13.

Dr Gail Saltz (pictured), an associate professor of psychiatry at NY Presbyterian Hospital's Weill-Cornell School, says she agrees with the move but fears it will put more strain on a care system health care overload.

Dr Gail Saltz (pictured), an associate professor of psychiatry at NY Presbyterian Hospital's Weill-Cornell School, says she agrees with the move but fears it will put more strain on a care system health care overload.

Dr Gail Saltz (pictured), an associate professor of psychiatry at NY Presbyterian Hospital’s Weill-Cornell School, says she agrees with the move but fears it will put more strain on a care system health care overload.

Dr Gail Saltz, an associate professor of psychiatry at NY Presbyterian Hospital Weill-Cornell Medical School, told DailyMail.com the group has also released similar guidance on screening for depression for Americans aged 8 to 65 years old in recent years.

Saltz advocates the move, hoping that more people who only see their primary care doctor for treatment and medical advice will get their first anxiety screening.

Getting treatment can be crucial for an estimated 40 million Americans with some form of the disease.

She explains: “Anxiety disorders disrupt people’s ability to function.

‘[It leads to other medical issues]that’s the problem with anxiety disorders… it can lead to clinical depression, high blood pressure…’

However, she worries that the already overwhelmed healthcare system could have trouble tackling a different task at each check-up.

Doctors often only have 15 minutes to spend with each patient before they have to get on with their packed schedules, leaving them often short of time and energy to perform all the necessary tasks.

When a patient is found to have a condition such as depression or anxiety, there are often not enough resources available to treat them, as the United States also faces a huge shortage of therapists and doctors. psychiatrist.

Source: | This article originally belonged to Dailymail.co.uk




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