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Fast fashion retailer Woman BLAST for ‘copying’ her designs


A crotchet artist who uses social media to promote her handmade designs has launched low-cost fashion websites and wholesalers copying her products for sale for as little as . A little piece.

Evvia Gonzales, 24, from Norwich, launched Loupy Studio after her handmade crochet designs became popular during the lockdown, with made-to-order tops selling for prices. about 140 pounds.

The crochet artist, who learned the skill from her grandmother, explains that it is difficult to stop fast fashion brands and wholesalers from ‘copying’ her designs and even leaving pictures she wears their clothes.

She revealed the shocking extent of the problem with Refinery29, saying: ‘I probably get about one direct message a week about another wholesaler on Pinterest using my photos with my face and pictures. their blur. I’ve asked them to take it down and every time it does, then post it again. ‘

Evvia Gonzales, 24, (pictured) from Norwich, claims fast fashion wholesalers and retailers have 'copied' her intricate crochet designs

Evvia Gonzales, 24, (pictured) from Norwich, claims fast fashion wholesalers and retailers have ‘copied’ her intricate crochet designs

Evvia (pictured) says she gets text messages about her designs appearing on sites like Dolls Kill almost every week

Dolls Kill had their hook ends removed (pictured) similar to Evvia's design

Evvia (pictured left) says she receives text messages almost every week about her designs appearing on sites like Dolls Kill (pictured right)

Evvia said her designs started getting 'copy' after she appeared on the Explore page on social media sites including Pinterest

Evvia said her designs started getting ‘copy’ after she appeared on the Explore page on social media sites including Pinterest

Evvia, also a caretaker, has had her work appear on the Discovery page of social networking sites since the creative hobby became a trend during the shutdown.

Inspired by Jean Paul Gaultier and Isa Boulder, Evvia revealed her brown stretchy square shirt was the first design to be copied.

It has since appeared on fashion wesbite y2kaesthetic.com, which used a photo from Evvia’s Instagram account to promote a copy of her design, which costs $41.72, while another site Emmiol is selling a similar look for £17.84.

She explained that as a crocheter, she could look at the pieces and tell them they were poor quality machine-made imitations.

Evvia vents frustration when brands claim to sell her crochet designs (pictured)

Evvia vents frustration when brands claim to sell her crochet designs (pictured)

Evvia (pictured), who learned crochet from her grandmother, said it was frustrating to see knitwear sold in bulk when she knew how long it took to make an item

Evvia (pictured), who learned crochet from her grandmother, said it was frustrating to see knitwear sold in bulk when she knew how long it took to make an item

Evvia (pictured) claims that it's hard for small creators to go after piracy and that many fast fashion sites have no legal contact

Evvia (pictured) claims that it’s hard for small creators to go after piracy and that many fast fashion sites have no legal contact

The Cambridge graduate says it’s unlikely that fast fashion brands like Dolls Kill and Emmoil are recreating designs on demand.

She said it was ‘really painful’ as she would never be able to recreate the used acrylic shirt again.

All of her products are made with yarn sourced from charity shops or from eBay, and are very unique.

Evvia explains that it’s very difficult to pursue piracy as a small creator, saying: ‘You feel like they’ve dragged you into this really complicated and confusing exploitative situation and you I feel like I have to do something. But what should I do? ‘

She claims that many sites have no legal contact you can talk to about any issues, and that images taken down from Pinterest are often reposted.

The designer says it’s likely people won’t get paid when wholesalers pull an item from their site after a complaint and where the bulk-made items end up there.

She added that it is important to support small creators because there is no way to solve the problem of stolen designs.

‘You can have a design stolen and it’s just lost – you no longer have control over it forever. But the fact that my face is attached to all these rogue salespeople is on another level,’ Evvia added.



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