Health

Miracle ‘toddles for the first time after breaking her spine in horror car crash


This is the moment a one-year-old girl miraculously took her first steps after a horrific car crash that nearly left her paralyzed.

A motorist suspected of drug use plowed straight into the front of Alice Poliska’s mother’s car at an aggregate speed of 110mph in Merthyr Tydfil, Wales, in December.

Her injured mother, Magda, watched Alice and her sister Maya, three, be taken to the hospital in an ambulance after she pulled them out of the wreckage.

Alice was taken to A&E at the University Hospital of Wales, where doctors discovered her spine was damaged and feared she would never walk again.

Her neck was broken and doctors put her in a coma before telling her mother what had happened.

They explained that the chances of a child her age surviving the trauma were so low they struggled to find a halo traction – a device that helps lengthen the spine – that was small enough for her.

The bruise on her spine could have killed her if it had moved to her brain and she had to have a tracheostomy on December 16 because she was still unable to breathe.

Surgeons didn’t know if the damage to the left side of her body that made her unable to walk was permanent, and were forced to insert a rod into her back in a dangerous procedure.

But three months later, after hours of physical therapy and exercise, Alice defied doctors’ expectations by taking her first steps on March 3.

Alice Poliska, one, miraculously takes her first steps after being in a horrific car accident that left her nearly paralyzed in Merthyr Tydfil, Wales

Alice Poliska, one, miraculously takes her first steps after being in a horrific car accident that left her nearly paralyzed in Merthyr Tydfil, Wales

Alice was taken to A&E at the University of Wales Hospital, where doctors discovered her spine was damaged and feared she would never walk again.

Alice was taken to A&E at the University of Wales Hospital, where doctors discovered her spine was damaged and feared she would never walk again.

Alice Poliska, one, miraculously takes her first steps after being in a horrific car accident that left her nearly paralyzed in Merthyr Tydfil, Wales

Alice had a tracheostomy and doctors explained a child's chance of surviving the injury was so low that they struggled to find a coronal traction - a device to lengthening the spine (in the photo) - small enough for her.

Alice had a tracheostomy and doctors explained a child's chance of surviving the injury was so low that they struggled to find a coronal traction - a device to lengthening the spine (in the photo) - small enough for her.

Alice had a tracheostomy and doctors explained a child’s chance of surviving the injury was so low that they struggled to find a coronal traction – a device to lengthening the spine (in the photo) – small enough for her.

Magda said: ‘It was the worst three months of our family’s lives, especially when we had to spend so much time together at a time when all we wanted to do was be together. .

‘But there have also been many miracles. We’ve heard so many times about how lucky we all are to survive such an accident and even more so when Alice survived such a terrible spinal injury. ‘

When Alice was admitted to the hospital, doctors said she had broken her spine between the first and second vertebrae in her neck and bruises around her spinal ligaments.

After recovering from her own injuries – a broken wrist, face and bruises – at A&E the next morning, Magda went to the Children’s Critical Care Unit where Alice was being treated.

She was told that her daughter might never be able to walk again because a spinal injury had damaged the left side of her body.

Her injured mother, Magda, witnessed Alice and her sister Maya (pictured together), three, taken to the hospital in an ambulance after she pulled them out of the water

Her injured mother, Magda, witnessed Alice and her sister Maya (pictured together), three, taken to the hospital in an ambulance after she pulled them out of the water

Maya (right) suffered bruises and broken arm but was fine after the collision, both girls were in the back of the car.

Maya (right) suffered bruises and broken arm but was fine after the collision, both girls were in the back of the car.

Her injured mother Magda (left) witnessed Alice and her sister Maya (pictured together, right), three people, taken to hospital in an ambulance after she pulled them out of the car pour

Alice of Cwmbran, South Wales, has been transferred to Noah Ark Children's Hospital in Cardiff for rehabilitation

Alice of Cwmbran, South Wales, has been transferred to Noah Ark Children's Hospital in Cardiff for rehabilitation

Alice of Cwmbran, South Wales, has been transferred to Noah Ark Children’s Hospital in Cardiff for rehabilitation

What are spinal cord injuries and how likely are they to cause paralysis?

A spinal cord injury is any injury to the spine from the neck down.

They can cause paralysis if they lead to damage to the spinal cord, which controls the body’s motor functions.

Depending on the location of the injury, they can cause the user to lose their legs (hemiplegia) or arms and legs (quadriplegia).

The higher you go, the more you damage the spinal cord, and the more movement and sensation will be affected – with neck injuries more likely to lead to quadriplegia.

Car accidents are one of the main causes of paralysis, but spinal cord injuries from collisions are still extremely rare.

Around 2,500 people suffer spinal cord injuries in the UK each year, while there were 119,850 injuries from car crashes in 2019.

Alice was unable to breathe on her own, and doctors surgically opened her airway before explaining that she would need a dangerous surgery to insert the rod into her back.

Magda said: ‘They told my husband and I the surgery was extremely risky but we knew that if Alice had any hope of a normal life this was the only option.

‘The list that the surgeon wrote about terrible things that could happen was so long that it was almost flipped off the page.

‘By signing that piece of paper, we agreed to an operation our daughter may never return to. It was the hardest thing I’ve ever done in my life. ‘

Thankfully, the surgery was a success and Alice of Cwmbran, South Wales, was transferred to Noah’s Ark Children’s Hospital in Cardiff for rehabilitation.

Magda said: ‘Having this wonderful hospital with so many specialties to care for Alice feels like a gift.

‘I was extremely scared that Alice would be paralyzed when this first happened, but the physics team came in every day, building both me and Alice’s confidence until she was able to sit and even stopped.

‘Now you can’t even tell the difference between her right and left. We are so grateful to all of them for what they have done. ‘

Her other daughter, Maya, had bruises and broken arms but was okay after the collision, both girls were in the back of the car.

A 39-year-old man from Monmouthshire has been arrested on suspicion of causing serious injury by dangerous driving, driving while under the influence of drugs and possessing a Class C controlled drug.

He was released after the investigation.

Source: | This article originally belonged to Dailymail.co.uk



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