Health

Warning for those with upset stomachs as research suggests people who have trouble sleeping may be at risk of type 2 diabetes


One study found that people who eat young worms may have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

University of Bristol researchers found people who had trouble sleeping had higher blood sugar levels – a sign of the condition.

The findings suggest that self-treating insomnia through lifestyle changes or medication could prevent tens of thousands of Britons from developing the condition.

The team calculated that treating insomnia could reduce blood sugar levels by the equivalent of 14kg (3lbs 2).

Dozens of studies have shown that people who toss and turn at night or go to bed later have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes.

But the researchers say their study is the most comprehensive to show that a lack of sleep itself causes higher blood sugar levels – and ‘may play a direct role in the development of type diabetes’ 2.

They did not suggest a biological mechanism for their findings, published in the journal Diabetes Care.

But earlier studies have found that sleep deprivation increases insulin resistance, levels of the stress hormone cortisol, and inflammation in the body, all of which can affect blood sugar levels.

And experts claim tired people are more likely to overeat and turn to sugary foods. Type 2 diabetes is mainly caused by obesity.

Researchers at the University of Bristol, who studied more than 300,000 Britons, found that those who had trouble falling asleep or staying asleep were more likely to have higher blood sugar levels - a signs of this condition.

Researchers at the University of Bristol, who studied more than 300,000 Britons, found that those who had trouble falling asleep or staying asleep were more likely to have higher blood sugar levels - a signs of this condition.

Researchers at the University of Bristol, who studied more than 300,000 Britons, found that those who had trouble falling asleep or staying asleep were more likely to have higher blood sugar levels – a signs of this condition.

To assess whether sleep plays a role in blood sugar levels, researchers collected data on 336,999 adults from the UK Biobank.

They examined data on whether the participants, mostly in their fifties, had insomnia.

They probed for information on how long they slept each night, how tired they were during the day, their napping habits, and whether they were morning or evening people.

WHAT IS DIABETES?

Diabetes is a long-term condition that causes a person’s blood sugar to become too high.

There are 2 main types of diabetes:

  • type 1 diabetes – where the body’s immune system attacks and destroys insulin-producing cells
  • type 2 diabetes – where the body does not produce enough insulin or the body’s cells do not respond to insulin

Type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1. In the UK, around 90% of adults with diabetes have type 2.

Blood sugar is controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is produced by the pancreas (a gland located behind the stomach).

As food is digested and enters the bloodstream, insulin moves glucose out of the blood and into cells, where it is broken down for energy.

However, if you have diabetes, your body cannot break down glucose for energy. This is because there isn’t enough insulin to move the glucose, or the insulin produced doesn’t work properly.

There are no lifestyle changes you can make to reduce your risk of type 1 diabetes.

You can help manage type 2 diabetes through healthy eating, regular exercise, and achieving a healthy body weight.

Source: NHS

The participants’ average blood glucose levels were also measured.

People who said they ‘often’ had trouble falling asleep or staying asleep (28% in the group) had higher blood sugar than those who said they ‘never’, ‘rarely’ or ‘occasionally’ faced these problems, a data analysis math shows.

But there was no indication that other characteristics – sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, naps and when they were most energetic – had any effect.

The team says the findings could improve understanding of how sleep disturbances affect the risk of type 2 diabetes.

The study also found that lifestyle and pharmacological interventions to improve insomnia could help prevent or treat diabetes, which is affected by 4.7 million people in the UK and 37 million in the US. .

People with insomnia are advised to go to bed and wake up at the same time every day, avoid eating late-night meals, and exercise regularly during the day.

If lifestyle changes don’t work, current treatments for insomnia include cognitive behavioral therapy, a talk therapy that aims to change thoughts and behaviors that keep someone from sleeping.

If this doesn’t work, patients are often given a short course of sleeping pills or pills containing the hormone melatonin, which occurs naturally in the body and helps control sleep.

The team says future studies should look at how each of these treatments impacts blood sugar levels in people with and without diabetes.

They say this could establish ‘potential new treatments’ to prevent and treat the condition.

James Liu, a researcher at Bristol Medical School and an author of the study, said: ‘We estimate that an effective treatment for insomnia could lower glucose levels more than a single treatment. equivalent intervention, resulting in a 14kg body weight loss in a person of average height.

‘This means that around 27,300 UK adults, aged 40 to 70, with frequent symptoms of insomnia would not develop diabetes if their insomnia were treated.’

Dr Faye Riley, director of research communication at Diabetes UK, which funded the study, said: ‘We know from previous research that there is a link between sleep and diabetes risk. type 2 of a person.

‘But it’s still not clear which came first, poor sleep or higher blood sugar, or whether other factors are at play.’ ‘

Study ‘provides us with important insights into the direction of the relationship between sleep and type 2 diabetes, suggesting that insufficient sleep’ can cause higher blood sugar and may close a direct role in the ‘development’ of the condition, she said.

Dr Riley said: “Knowing this could open up new approaches to help prevent or manage the condition.

But she notes that type 2 diabetes is a ‘complex condition with many risk factors’, so eating a balanced and active diet are ‘essential elements of good health’ , including those who live with or are at risk for the disease.

Source: | This article originally belonged to Dailymail.co.uk



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